Coconut Pad Thai

Nov 30, 2011   //   by Kelly   //   Blog, Recipes  //  No Comments

People often think that when you switch to a healthier diet you’re going to be missing out on a lot of those foods that you love. I prefer to think of all the new ways I can make the recipes that I love. Have my Pad Thai and eat it too! Pad Thai is not necesarily an unhealthy recipe. The rice noodles are gluten free which is great and there are always veges, but when you order it in a restaurant the sauce is often filled with lots of oil and sugar and as a vegan I always have to watch out for the hidden fish sauce. Now that I eat mostly raw foods that are full of fresh flavour if I’m eating out with friends and order a cooked version it usually doesn’t live up to my memories of when I used to enjoy that kind of food. It can just seem kind of dull and stodgy.

It’s really simple to make a healthier version of almost any recipe. One that is often much more vibrant and tasty. You just need to look at the flavours and use them in a slightly different way. The real flavour of Pad Thai comes from the sauce, it’s sweet, sour, salty, spicy, tangy and nutty. So I just look at how I can recreate that without all the added refined oil, sugar and fish sauce.

Young Thai coconuts make really amazing noodles and also give it that extra tropical flavour. If you can’t find them just use extra zucchini noodles. Both of these make great alternatives to wheat or white rice noodles that can sometimes make you feel heavy after a meal.
 

Ingredients

Meat from 2 young thai coconuts
2 zucchini
2 carrots
2 cups of shredded red cabbage
1/2 of a red bell pepper
1 spring onion stalk
10 almonds

 

For the Sauce

the leftover cores of the zucchini
2 pitted medjool dates
8 cherry tomatoes or 2 medium tomatoes
2cm slice of fresh ginger
1/4 tsp cayenne pepper or more to taste
Juice of 1/2 a lemon
Juice of 1 lime
2 tbsp tamari
10 almonds

 

Directions

1. Open the coconuts, save the liquid for a smoothie and remove the meat.
There are a couple of ways to open a coconut. You can chop into it with a large cleaver but I like to shave the husk off the top and twist a knife into the shell. If you’re unsure how to open a coconut check out this video. It can be hit and miss with the quality of coconuts. You want to make sure the meat and water are not purple, that means it’s gone bad. Sometimes the meat will be very thin and a bit jelly-ish, that doesn’t make for the best noodles. When you get one with thick meat on the inside that’s the best kind to make noodles with. Unfortunately you can’t tell this when you buy one. To make noodles you want to scrape the meat out in one or two pieces. Start at the top with the back of the spoon facing down and gently push it down prying the meat from the shell. Make sure to wash the meat and remove and bits of shell that may be on there. You can also use a vegetable peeler to remove any brown pieces.

2. Slice the coconut meat into long thin noodles and place in a large bowl.

3. Use a vegetable peeler to create long flat noodles from the carrots and zucchini. Just run the peeler up and down as you turn the carrots and zucchini. With the zucchini stop once you reach the seeded core. Add these to the coconut noodles.

4. Add the shredded red cabbage and sliced red bell pepper and mix everything together.

5. Finely slice or chop the almonds and the spring onions and save to use as a garnish.

 

Making the sauce

Add all ingredients to a blender and blend until smooth.

 

Serving Suggestions

Plate up the vegetable noodle mixture and pour the sauce over the top. Garnish with almonds and spring onions as shown.

 

Variations

The coconut noodles are a great feature of this recipe, but if you can’t find young thai coconuts the recipe will work fine without them. Just use extra zucchini noodles. The main flavours come from the sauce which could also be used as a salad dressing.

Other vegetables that could be added or substituted are mung bean sprouts, green beans, white cabbage and snow pea shoots. You could also add in broccoli and cauliflower for different textures.

Mexican Corn Salad

Sep 12, 2011   //   by myrakelly   //   Blog, Recipes  //  No Comments

Sweetcorn has just started coming into season and when I spotted them on special at the market I knew what what going to be on tonights menu. This recipe is great as a salad or instead of chopping the lettuce you could fill the leaves and eat like a taco!

 

Mexican Corn Salad

Fresh Sweetcorn Kernels

Diced Tomatoes

Diced Red Bell Pepper

Diced Red Onion

Chopped Lettuce

Avocado

Lemon Juice

Cayenne Pepper

Himalayan Salt

Dried Garlic Powder

Tom Kha or Tom Yum with Spiced Coconut Dumplings

Oct 17, 2009   //   by Kelly   //   Recipes  //  1 Comment

Tom Kha

I love Thai food. The flavours are always so fresh and vegetables are often the star. Tom Yum is one of the cooked dishes I will eat if I am going out to dinner with friends and there are no raw options. It’s still all vegetables in a light spicy broth. But making a raw version of Tom Yum or Tom Kha is so easy to do at home. The main difference between the two is just the coconut which is used in Tom Kha. So if you are looking for a fat-free version just leave it out and perhaps add extra tomato for a Tom Yum version.

 

Tom Kha

Ingredients

 

Stock

1 Stalk of Lemongrass

1 Lime Leaf

1cm Piece of Ginger

1cm Piece of Galangal

2 Stalks of Celery

1 Cup Dried Coconut

2 Cups of Spring Water

1 Tomato

2 Tbsp Lemon Juice

1 Tbsp Miso Paste

1/4 Tsp Cayenne Pepper

 

Fillings

Choose from a variety of fresh raw shredded or spiralised vegetables like cucumber or zucchini noodles, carrot, mung bean sprouts, snow pea greens, cabbage, tomatoes, turnips or anything else that you have. In the picture above I used snow pea greens and cucumber sliced into wide noodles with a vegetable peeler and a few slivers of avocado.

 

Preparation

Place the lemongrass, lime leaf, ginger, galangal, celery, coconut and water into a blender and process until well mixed. Strain through a nutmilk bag or a fine sieve. 

Pour the liquid back into the blender and add the remaining ingredients. Blend well.

You may like to gently warm the stock to a low temperature before pouring over the vegetables, but it does just fine as a cold soup as well.

Place your vegetables of choice into a bowl and pour the stock over the top.

 

Dumplings

As a way of using up the pulp left over from creating the stock, I tried making these little dumplings. Simply form hand rolled balls from the pulp. They will crumble if you sit them in the soup for too long, but you could place them on top of the vegetable of your tom kha or eat them right away. They would probably do well in the dehydrator also.

dumplings